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Shooting Information from Fort Chambers Inc.
3292 Black Gap Rd
Chambersburg, Pa. 17201
Fax/Phone 717-263-2223
E-mail Fort Chambers Inc 

 

There are a number of ways to do this.  I am only going to show you how I do it and what works for me. During the last 40 some years of sighting in black powder rifles for myself and for customers; this is the simplest and cheapest way to do it that I have found. 

Whether you are shooting a flintlock, percussion, or an inline; the same basic principle applies. Your rifle being a standard 100 yard rifle or one of the magnum 200 yard rifles, the process is still the same.

 WORKING UP A LOAD

Here are some basic rules I use and I really do stick to them as much as possible.

~~3 SHOT GROUPS                    Shoot ONLY 3 shots at one target. Targets are cheap.  

~~A REST                              The rest should be as steady as you can get it. If the bench is shaky, your groups will not be good.                                 

~~25 YARDS                          If the target is close, it will make it easier to see your target, sight picture and your bullet holes.

~~SIGHTS                              Do NOT change your sights while working up your load. You are looking for a TIGHT GROUP, just so your shots are on the paper.

 Remembering and using these basic rules, you can work up your Target loads, or Hunting loads

Hunting Loads for 50 cal using sabots:           Hunting Loads for 50 cal using sabots:

For 100 yard standard rifles:                       For 200 yard magnum rifles:

 80 grains FFg,  (3 shots only, rest.)             80 grains FFg,  (3 shots only, rest.)

 85 grains FFg,  (3 shots only, rest.)             90 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

 90 grains FFg,  (3 shots only, rest.)             95 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

 95 grains FFg,  (3 shots only, rest.)           100 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

100 grains FFg, (3 shots only, rest.)           105 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              110 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              115 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              120 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              125 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              130 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              135 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              140 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              145 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

                                                                              150 grains FFg,   (3 shots only, rest.)

 What is a Good Group?

 That depends on what you call a good group.

According to Thompson/Center Arms, a 2 to 3 group is good hunting accuracy, at 50 yards. Target or Competition shoots want a one hole group at that distance. (For some, hitting a paper plate at 50 yards is good enough.)

Remember, these black powder rifles are normally capable of shooting better groups than we can hold.

 At What Distance should I Sight my rifle in for Deer?

For Standard 100 yard rifles, I recommend dead on at 50 yards.

Any shots out to 75 yards, you can hold DEAD ON and know you have a good shot in the kill zone.

For shots beyond 75 yards, put your target up at 100 yards. Fire 2 or 3 shots to see how much it drops.

So, when a deer is beyond 75 yards but not more than 100 and your rifle shoots 4 inches low, you know to hold 4 inches high at that distance.

 For Magnum 200 yard rifles, I recommend DEAD ON at 100 yards.

Any shots from 75 out to 150 yards, you can hold DEAD ON and know you have a good shot in the kill zone.

For shots out to 75 yards, put your target up at 50 yards and see how high it shoots.

So, when deer are less than 50 to 75 yards, you know to hold 2 inches low at that distance for the kill zone.

For shots beyond 150 yards out to 200 yards, put your target up at 200 yards and see how much the shot drops.

So, when the deer is between 150 Yards to 200 yards, you know to hold that much high and still be in the kill zone.

 How Do I Adjust My Sights or Scope?

 This rule of thumb may help:

 MOVE YOUR BACK SIGHT in the direction you WANT the PROJECTILE to GO.

So, if your shot is 6 inches LOW, you want your projectile to go UP, which means you want to adjust your REAR SIGHT UP.  Windage works the same way.

 

    
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